Thursday, 20 October 2011

Killing Gaddafi Spares ICC Embarrassment For US & Britain


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Like Milosevic, Gaddafi would have thrust western support for Al-Qaeda fighters under the spotlight
Paul Joseph Watson
Infowars.com
Thursday, October 20, 2011
The death of Muammar Gaddafi, killed by NATO and US-backed rebels, will be hailed by western powers, not merely because they have now seized control of another oil-rich country under the dubious auspices of the “Arab Spring,” but because Gaddafi will be prevented from exposing western support for Al-Qaeda terrorists under the glare of a UN International Criminal Court trial.
Initial reports suggest that Gaddafi attempted to flee the town of Sirte but his convoy was bombed by NATO warplanes. Rebels then captured and killed the former Libyan leader by putting a bullet through his head.
The former Libyan leader’s untimely death conveniently avoids the embarrassment of having to put him in front of a United Nations tribunal at the Hague.
Western powers have learned this lesson the hard way – allowing alleged war criminals to stand trial and voice their grievances routinely implicates parties that would much prefer such information be kept out of the spotlight.
Instead of capturing Saddam Hussein alive and allowing him to stand trial, US forces would have probably been better off killing him on the spot. During his court case, Hussein presented a 5,000 word treatise chastising the Bush administration for concocting lies about WMD and links with Al-Qaeda to launch the invasion of Iraq. Before Saddam was executed, there was also talk of him calling Donald Rumsfeld and Henry Kissinger, who in the late 70′s forged alliances with Hussein, as defense witnesses.
Allowing another accused war criminal, Slobodan Milosevic, to stand trial, also proved to be a massive mistake for western interests.
In the case of Milosevic, his outbursts became so damaging that the UN decided it would be better to poison him to death rather than let him continue to expose the fact that western war crimes dwarfed anything he was accused of.
Milosevic had made several speeches in which he discussed how a group of shadowy internationalists had caused the chaos in the Balkans because it was the next step on the road to a “new world order.”
During his trial, Milosevic presented the Hague tribunal with FBI documents proving that the United States government and NATO provided financial and military support for Al-Qaeda to aid the Kosovo Liberation Army in its war against Serbia.
Before the trial concluded, Milosevic was found dead in his cell a day after he had wrote a letter stating, “They would like to poison me. I’m seriously concerned and worried.”
Similarly, had Muammar Gaddafi been given the opportunity to defend himself in front of an international tribunal, his testimony would have been devastating on everything from the staged Lockerbie false flag attack, the US and NATO slaughtering his children, to his secret deals with former heads of state like Tony Blair, to his more recent meeting with President Barack Obama.
Specifically, he would have also have blown the whistle on the fact that the overthrow of Libya was accomplished with the aid of Al-Qaeda terrorists who killed U.S. and British troops in Iraq.
Gaddafi may also have pointed to the plight of black Libyans, who are being imprisoned and slaughtered by rebel forces hailed by the establishment media as freedom fighters.
Now that Gaddafi is dead, Libya will fall victim to political extremists and face the same fate as Egypt, which since the US-backed “Arab Spring” at the start of the year which displaced Mubarak, has turned into an even worse tyranny overseen by a military dictatorship.
But the mainstream networks will merely continue to broadcast scenes of cheering men firing guns into the air, selling another act of cynical neo-imperialism as a glorious liberation.
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Paul Joseph Watson is the editor and writer for Prison Planet.com. He is the author of Order Out Of Chaos. Watson is also a regular fill-in host for The Alex Jones Show.

Gadhafi, Libya's leader for 42 years, killed


SIRTE, Libya (AP) — Moammar Gadhafi, who ruled Libya with a dictatorial grip for 42 years until he was ousted by his own people in an uprising that turned into a bloody civil war, was killed Thursday when revolutionary forces overwhelmed his hometown, Sirte, the last major bastion of resistance two months after his regime fell.
The 69-year-old Gadhafi is the first leader to be killed in the Arab Spring wave of popular uprisings that swept the Midde East, demanding the end of autocratic rulers and greater democracy. Gadhafi had been one of the world's most mercurial leaders, dominating Libya with a regime that often seemed run by his whims and bringing international condemnation and isolation on his country for years.
"We have been waiting for this moment for a long time. Moammar Gadhafi has been killed," Prime Minister Mahmoud Jibril told a news conference in the capital Tripoli.
Initial reports from fighters said Gadhafi had been barricaded in with his heavily armed loyalists in the last few buildings they held in his Mediterranean coastal hometown of Sirte, furiously battling with revolutionary fighters closing in on them Thursday. At one point, a convoy tried to flee the area and was blasted by NATO airstrikes, though it was not clear if Gadhafi was in the vehicles. Details of his death remained unverified.
Al-Jazeera TV showed footage of a man resembling the 69-year-old Gadhafi lying dead or severely wounded, bleeding from the head and stripped to the waist as fighters rolled him over on the pavement.
The body was then taken to the nearby city of Misrata, which Gadhafi's forces besieged for months in one of the bloodiest fronts of the civil war. Al-Arabiya TV showed footage of Gadhafi's bloodied body carried on the top of a vehicle surrounded by a large crowd chanting, "The blood of the martyrs will not go in vain."
Celebratory gunfire and cries of "Allahu Akbar" or "God is Great" rang out across the capital Tripoli. Cars honked their horns and people hugged each other. In Sirte, the ecstatic former rebels celebrated the city's fall after weeks of bloody siege by firing endless rounds into the sky, pumping their guns, knives and even a meat cleaver in the air and singing the national anthem.
Libya's new leaders had said they would declare the country's "liberation" after the fall of Sirte.
The death of Gadhafi adds greater solidity to that declaration.
It rules out a scenario that some had feared — that he might flee deeper into Libya's southern deserts and lead a resistance campaign against Libya's rulers. The fate of two of his sons, Seif al-Islam and Muatassim, as well as some top figures of his regime remains unknown, but their ability to rally loyalists would be deeply undermined with Gadhafi's loss.
Information Minister Mahmoud Shammam said he was told that Gadhafi was dead from fighters who said they saw the body.
"Our people in Sirte saw the body," Shammam told The Associated Press. "Revolutionaries say Gadhafi was in a convoy and that they attacked the convoy."
Sirte's fall caps weeks of heavy, street-by-street fighting as revolutionary fighters besieged the city. Despite the fall of Tripoli on Aug. 21, Gadhafi loyalists mounted fierce resistance in several areas, including Sirte, preventing Libya's new leaders from declaring full victory in the eight-month civil war. Earlier this week, revolutionary fighters gained control of one stronghold, Bani Walid.
By Tuesday, fighters said they had squeezed Gadhafi's forces in Sirte into a residential area of about 700 square yards but were still coming under heavy fire from surrounding buildings.
In an illustration of how heavy the fighting has been, it took the anti-Gadhafi fighters two days to capture a single residential building.
Reporters at the scene watched as the final assault began around 8 a.m. Thursday and ended about 90 minutes later. Just before the battle, about five carloads of Gadhafi loyalists tried to flee the enclave down the coastal highway that leads out of the city. But they were met by gunfire from the revolutionaries, who killed at least 20 of them.
Col. Roland Lavoie, spokesman for NATO's operational headquarters in Naples, Italy, said the alliance's aircraft Thursday morning struck two vehicles of pro-Gadhafi forces "which were part of a larger group maneuvering in the vicinity of Sirte."
But NATO officials, speaking on condition of anonymity in accordance to alliance rules, said the alliance also could not independently confirm whether Gadhafi was killed or captured.
The Misrata Military Council, one of the command groups, said its fighters captured Gadhafi.
Another commander, Abdel-Basit Haroun, said Gadhafi was killed when the airstrike hit the fleeing convoy.
One fighter who said he was at the battle told AP Television News that the final fight took place at an opulent compound for visiting dignitaries built by Gadhafi's regime. Adel Busamir said the convoy tried to break out but after being hit it turned back and re-entered the compound. Several hundred fighters assaulted.
"We found him there," Busamir said. "We saw them beating him (Gadhafi) and someone shot him with a 9mm pistol ... then they took him away."
Military spokesman Col. Ahmed Bani in Tripoli told Al-Jazeera TV that a wounded Gadhafi "tried to resist (revolutionary forces) so they took him down."
"I reassure everyone that this story has ended and this book has closed," he said.
After the battle, revolutionaries began searching homes and buildings looking for any hiding Gadhafi fighters. At least 16 were captured, along with cases of ammunition and trucks loaded with weapons. Reporters saw revolutionaries beating captured Gadhafi men in the back of trucks and officers intervening to stop them.
In the central quarter where Thursday's final battle took place, the fighters looking like the same ragtag force that started the uprising eight months ago jumped up and down with joy and flashed V-for-victory signs. Some burned the green Gadhafi flag, then stepped on it with their boots.
They chanted "Allah akbar," or "God is great" in Arabic, while one fighter climbed a traffic light pole to unfurl the revolution's flag, which he first kissed. Discarded military uniforms of Gadhafi's fighters littered the streets. One revolutionary fighter waved a silver trophy in the air while another held up a box of firecrackers, then set them off.
"Our forces control the last neighborhood in Sirte," Hassan Draoua, a member of Libya's interim National Transitional Council, told The Associated Press in Tripoli. "The city has been liberated."
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Associated Press Writer Kim Gamel in Tripoli contributed to this report.

LIBYA LIVE: Officials say Gadhafi was captured


The hometown of Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi fell today as the last vestige of control for the man once hailed as the "king of kings of Africa" came to an end. And officials in the transitional government say Gadhafi, who has been in hiding since rebels seized control of Tripoli, was captured or killed.
Here's a running account of the day's developments. All times are local in Libya, which is two hours ahead of GMT and six hours ahead of EDT.
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4:02 p.m.
Al-Jazeera TV is airing shaky footage of a man resembling Gadhafi lying dead or badly wounded, bleeding from the head and stripped to the waist as fighters roll him over on the pavement.
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3:58 p.m.
The White House isn't saying much about developments in Libya while U.S. officials await more word. But even before confirmation, Sen. John McCain called it "an end to the first phase of the Libyan revolution."
He said the U.S. and NATO should continue support for Libya. The U.S. led the start of the NATO air campaign that bolstered the rebel forces in the early days.
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3:50 p.m.
Tomorrow marks two months since Tripoli fell to the rebels and Gadhafi disappeared from his compound in the capital. At the time, their transitional government said they dedicated a special unit of crack fighters to track him down.
There have been rumors of Gadhafi's whereabouts for weeks — some said he was in neighboring Niger or Algeria, some said he could be in a bunker deep beneath Tripoli.
Today in Niger, Aghaly Alambo, a native of Niger who became a part of Gadhafi's inner circle, said he was watching TV and following the developments closely, but his own sources in Libya had not yet been able to confirm the reports of Gahdafi's capture.
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3:44 p.m.
Libyan officials are calling a news conference in Tripoli with Mahmoud Jibril, the prime minister of the transitional government and the highest-ranking official in the capital now. It's scheduled to begin in 15 minutes.
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3:32 p.m.
There are celebrations in the streets in Tripoli as reports spread of Gadhafi's capture or possible death. The transitional government summoned journalists more than an hour ago for an imminent news conference, but they still haven't made an official announcement.
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3:04 p.m.
In Sirte, fighters who have battled for months to seize control of the country from Gadhafi's forces embraced in the streets and chanted. "The war, it's finished," one fighter said.
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2:54 p.m.
A spokesman for Libya's transitional government says Gadhafi has been captured and possibly killed in the fall of his hometown. Information Minister Mahmoud Shammam says he expects the prime minister to make an announcement in an hour or so. Past reports of Gadhafi's death or capture have been wrong.
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2:44 p.m.
NATO confirms they've hit a convoy of Gadhafi loyalists fleeing Sirte, and Libyan fighters say they captured the ousted leader.
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2:14 p.m.
White House officials are monitoring the reports of Gadhafi's capture and death but say they can't confirm anything. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton was just in Libya yesterday and said then she hoped for his demise. She also offered U.S. aid to the interim government.
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2:09 p.m.
Libyan officials and NATO say they can't confirm reports that Gadhafi was captured or killed today when his hometown fell.
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12:36 p.m.
Discarded military uniforms of Gadhafi's forces are in the streets. One fighter climbed a traffic light, kissed the revolution's flag then unfurled it.
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11:35 a.m.
"The city has been liberated," says Hassan Draoua, a member of Libya's interim government. The Libyan fighters were seen beating captured Gadhafi men in the back of trucks, with officers trying to stop them.
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11:05 a.m.
Gadhafi's hometown, Sirte, has fallen to the rebels. Our reporter in the city says Libyan fighters are searching homes and buildings looking for any Gadhafi loyalists who might be hiding.