Secret Weapons: Technology, Science and the Race to Win World War II

Secret Weapons: Technology, Science and the Race to Win World War II

Description


Powerful illustrations and a unique new narrative make this an incomparable illustrated history of the secret weapons that changed the course of World War II. The book's basic structure is chronological, charting the race in technology between the Allied and Axis powers, with examples of their use in battle, along with those that remained experimental or remained the stuff of science fiction.

Importantly (and of interest to the general reader) it also shows how wartime research anticipated the high-tech era in which we now live. The account charts secret weapons development from the Japanese ray gun of the 1930s to the powerful V2 rocket, and compares World War II secret weapons research with the realities of present-day science.

It's a riveting story of innovation under pressure, from a world of machine guns and biplanes to electronics, rockets, and nuclear bombs with the power to wipe out humanity.

About the Author


Brian J Ford is a prolific research scientist who launched major science programms for the BBC. His books pioneer new approaches in bringing science to the public. Over 100 editions of his books have been published around the world, and he appears in TV programmes produced in studios ranging from Hollywood to Delhi, and from Germany to Japan.

He was a NESTA Fellow 2004-2007, was presented with the inaugural Köhler medal in America for his work in microscopy, and has been nominated for the prestigious Faraday Medal of the Royal Society in London. His work is widely reported and discussed in journals including Scientific American, Nature, New Scientist, The Microscope and the British Medical Journal; his discoveries feature in many text-books and CD-ROMs.

In addition to textbooks he has also written the popular 101 Questions about Science books. His First Encyclopaedia of Science (for the pre-teens) sold over 70,000 copies in a month. Brian J Ford contributes to The Guardian, The Daily Telegraph and The Times.


Product DetailsISBN-10: 1849083908
ISBN-13: 9781849083904
Published: Osprey Publishing, 09/20/2011
Pages: 304
Language: English

Allies Wanted To Turn Hitler Into A Woman

Not entirely turn him into a woman of course, but a new book by Professor Brian Ford from Cardiff University details some bizarre plans that the allies had for dealing with the Führer.

Secret Weapons: Technology, Science And The Race To Win World War II. The title alone makes me want to go out and buy the book. According to the author:

“There was an allied plan that they would smuggle oestrogen into Hitler’s food and change his sex so he would become more feminine and less aggressive.

“Their research had showed the importance of sex hormones – they were beginning to be used in sex therapy in London.

“The plan was to give sex hormones to Hitler and counterbalance his unnecessary aggression.”

So no, the allies did not plan on storming into a German bunker, dragging Hitler out and forcefully putting a dress and makeup on him. This was a plan to lace Hitler’s food with estrogen, in efforts to bend his out of control aggressiveness. Which if you really think about it, MIGHT have worked on Hitler. We all know that high levels of estrogen has been found in the food that sent out to prisons across the United States, in efforts to control the aggressive male prisoners. But would that plan have really worked on someone as deranged as Hitler?

Full source: Wales Online UK

Bizarre plans hatched by the allies to win the second world war have been revealed for the first time – including a plot to turn Hitler into a woman.

Allies thought by smuggling female sex hormones into the fuhrer’s food they could turn him into a woman and curb his aggressive impulses.

The plot was just one of a number of wacky schemes cooked up to break the war’s stalemate, according to a new book by a Welsh-based author.

Others included dropping glue on Nazi troops in an attempt to stick them to the ground, as well as creating bombs made to look like everyday tins of fruit and chocolate.

The hare-brained schemes are revealed for the first time in a new book called Secret Weapons: Technology, Science And The Race To Win World War II.

They have come to light now because of the publication of new documents not previously seen because of their sensitive nature.

The book is authored by Professor Brian Ford, a fellow at Cardiff University and pioneer of popular science.

He said the allies were deadly serious about turning the evil Austrian transgender – to be more like his placid sister Paula.

Professor Ford said: “There was an allied plan that they would smuggle oestrogen into Hitler’s food and change his sex so he would become more feminine and less aggressive.

“Their research had showed the importance of sex hormones – they were beginning to be used in sex therapy in London.

“The plan was to give sex hormones to Hitler and counterbalance his unnecessary aggression.”

Professor Ford said the plan was perfectly plausible because British spies were in place to lace his food with the hormones and it would have avoided detection for months.

“In fact it was found there were agents who would be able to get it into his food,” he said.

“It would have been entirely possible.

“He had testers who used to taste his food. There was no mileage to putting poison in his food because they would immediately fall victim to it.

“Sex hormones were a different matter. They only affected you if you took them for weeks or months on end so no-one would have realised the hormones were in the food.”

And Hitler’s sex change was not the only trick they had up their sleeve.

Another tactic saw allies draw up plans to drop boxes of poisonous snakes on the enemy, while they also spent fortunes developing a calamitous explosive-laden cart for an assault on Normandy – called the Great Panjandrum.



China denies Pakistan gave it helicopter access


BEIJING (AP) — China has rejected media reports that Pakistan gave it access to a radar-evading helicopter that crashed during the U.S. mission to kill Osama bin Laden, calling them "preposterous."
The international business newspaper Financial Times reported Sunday that Pakistan allowed Chinese military engineers to photograph and take samples of the stealth chopper before giving it back to the U.S.
In its first public response, China's Defense Ministry said in a one-line statement late Tuesday, "This report is baseless and preposterous."
The U.S. suspects that Pakistan shared the technology with China in retaliation for its May 2 raid that killed bin Laden on Pakistani soil, humiliating Islamabad.
A Pakistani official has denied the charge, saying Pakistan was aware the U.S. had bin Laden's compound and the helicopter wreckage under round-the-clock surveillance after the raid, so it would know whether foreign technical experts had examined it.
The helicopter was one of two modified Black Hawks that defense experts said evidently used radar-evading technology plus noise and heat suppression devices to slip across the Afghan-Pakistan border, avoid detection by Pakistani air defenses and deliver two dozen Navy SEALs into the hiding place of the al-Qaida leader.
One of the choppers crash-landed during the mission. Before leaving with bin Laden's corpse, commandos blew up the main body of the chopper, apparently to keep its stealth components secret.
Photos of the wreckage with the tail still visible flashed around the world, drawing immediate chatter among defense experts who noticed it appeared to have previously undisclosed technology.
The relationship between the U.S. and Pakistan took a nose dive after the bin Laden raid, which prompted celebrations in the U.S. but anger and embarrassment in Islamabad. Ties were already strained despite billions of dollars in American aid over the last decade because of Pakistan's reluctance to target Taliban militants on its territory who stage cross-border attacks against NATO troops in Afghanistan.
In contrast to the fickle Washington relations, Pakistan calls its relationship with China an "all-weather friendship." China provides Pakistan with aid and investment, while Pakistan offers Beijing diplomatic backing, including among Islamic nations who might otherwise criticize China's handling of its Muslim Uighur (pronounced WEE'-gur) minority.
The two also both distrust India. China fought India in a brief but bloody 1962 border war, and Pakistan has fought its neighbor three times since 1947.

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