Sunday, 25 November 2012

Chinese Naval Jet Performs First Deck Landing






BEIJING, November 25 (RIA Novosti) – A Chinese Shenyang J-15 fighter jet has successfully carried out the first arrested deck landing on the country’s only aircraft carrier, the Liaoning, Xinhua reported on Sunday citing naval sources.

This achievement marks a crucial step in the development of China’s ambitious aircraft carrier program as landing tests of carrier-based aircraft are the most challenging to perform.

“Capabilities of the carrier platform and the J-15 have been tested, meeting all requirements and achieving good compatibility,” the Chinese Navy said.





The J-15s had made many landings on land-based mock-ups of Liaoning’s deck and performed a number of touch-and-go take-offs and landings during sea trials last month before attempting an arrested landing on the deck of the aircraft carrier, according to Chinese naval experts.
Since the Liaoning entered service in September 2012, its crew has completed more than 100 training and testing programs.
The Admiral Kuznetsov class Varyag aircraft carrier was 70% complete when China bought it from Ukraine for $20 million in 1998. Before being sold, the ship was disarmed and its engines were removed.



China launched a complete overhaul of the ship in 2002, also developing carrier-based aircraft. Beijing has repeatedly insisted the carrier poses no threat to its neighbors and that it will primarily be used for training and research.
The 1,000-ft vessel is designed to carry 26 aircraft and 24 helicopters.

BEIJING (AP) — China's official news agency says the country has successfully landed a fighter jet on its first aircraft carrier.
Xinhua News Agency says the landing exercise marked the debut of a J-15 fighter jet, a carrier-based fighter-bomber developed by China.
Citing unnamed naval sources, Xinhua said Sunday that the carrier platform and J-15 capabilities met all requirements and achieved "good compatibility."
Xinhua says the J-15 is able to carry anti-ship, air-to-air and air-to-ground missiles and precision-guided bombs.
China's Liaoning ship formally entered into service in September, underscoring China's ambitions to be a leading Asian naval power. But it is not expected to carry a full complement of planes or be ready for combat for some time.