Saturday, 27 August 2011

Hurricane Irene : Latest And Update


  1. LATEST AND UPDATE : HURRICANE IRENE


    HURRICANE BUSTER

    Download this Schumann resonance mp3 (right mouse click over link and select “Save Link As…”) and save to your computer, cell phone or portable media player and play it during a severe storm. 

    If you don't hear a sound you're not suppose to hear anything - the sound is inaudible to the human ear.  The 7.83hz creates a positive standing wave of energy that builds up over time and helps to reestablish the positive healing energy of the earth itself.  

    The Schumann resonances can undo or cancel out HAARP weather modifying and earthquake inducing broadcasting frequencies. It also can disperse Chemtrails.   

    If played during severe weather storms like hurricanes or predicted earthquake event the Schumann resonance cancels out or simply alters the HAARP storm or earthquake inducing electromagnetic frequency.  This MP3 will help the Earth defend and heal itself.  You would also be protecting yourself, your family and home from the harmful and destructive HAARP attacks like Hurricane Irene.

    The Schumann resonance mp3 is 100% free to download. It hasn't been pirated. I, Paul W Kincaid (the editor of PRESS Core) made the MP3. I give everyone permission to share it with as many people as you want. 

    So share it with everyone you know. Text the link to everyone. Tweet it, Facebook it. Email it. It is the frequency that connects us with the Earth. Our brain is tuned to 7.83 Hz. NASA installed Schumann wave generators (7.83 Hz) on the International Space Station. 

    The first manned space flights created considerable physiological problems for astronauts, and it was only through the installation of Schumann wave generators that the side effects were remedied.
    “All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing." ~ Edmund Burke

  2. Lori Redman from Gaithersburg, Maryland 
    writes: We are in the high risk - not extreme risk - category for Irene's path. People are frantically running into stores to get supplies, cars swerving to avoid pedestrians and such. Personally, we have enough food for our pets and junk food for ourselves, though we're a little worried our power will go out- we're watching Mad Men and we'd hate to be interrupted.
  3. 1630: 
    President Barack Obama is visiting the Federal Emergency Management Agency's command centre for Hurricane Irene. The White House says Obama made clear that the hurricane's impact will be felt throughout the weekend and beyond, AP reports.
  4. 1623: 
    The shutdown has begun on New York's subway, AP reports, and the area's five airports have stopped accepting flights. Officials said that it would take about eight hours before all subway and bus lines were finally shut down saying that systems cannot operate in sustained winds higher then 39mph.
  5. 1618: 
    We have just published this picture galleryof Hurricane Irene's landfall on the US eastern coast. Here people on Virginia Beach point to the waves as the storm approaches. The authorities have repeatedly warned people to stay away from the beaches.
    Virginia Beach visitors point out the waves as Hurricane Irene approaches,Virginia  27 Aug

  6. The Daily's Greg Clayman 
    tweets: Am becoming increasing convinced that #Ireneis secret stimulus package. Never seen so many people buying so much stuff.

  7. Todd Kaderabek in North Carolina
    tweets: #Irene took out my friend's tree in Raleigh: t.co/mYRD0A4

  8. 1613: Marcus George BBC News, Washington 
    Hundreds of cars are lining up outside a parking lot in DC to pick up sandbags given out by the authorities. Washington is expecting high winds and heavy rain late on Saturday and through the night.

  9. Will McDowell from New York 
    writes: City Supermarkets are now closing the shutters and won't be open until Tuesday. Heavy rain has just started and the streets are empty, people have taped up their windows. But obviously it's New York, so everyone is loving the drama.

  10. Sam Dolnick of The New York Times
    tweets: Tourists standing forlornly outside shuttered MoMA, looking to get in. Love of art conquers fear of #Irene.
  11. 1603: Marcus George, BBC News, Washington
    says that the authorities in Virginia are bracing for Irene to strike. They say more than 100,000 residents are now without power. Tornado warnings have been issued for southern Chesapeake Bay.
  12. 1559: Ian Sherwood, BBC Deputy Washington Bureau Chief 
    says: "It will be interesting to see what happens when the subway closes down at noon in New York. Having lived there witnessed first-hand how many people rely on it to get around I am curious to see how Gotham reacts to losing it subway completely for a time. It is also impossible to get a cab in Manhattan when it rains when the subway is fully functioning..."

  13. The Washington Post Local 
    tweets: Officials in Ocean City say hundreds of residents have ignored mandatory evacuation orders ahead of Irene -http://t.co/pYyGMl3
  14. 1548: 
    PBF Energy says that its two north-eastern refineries were operating normally as the hurricane approached, Reuters reported. But a spokesman said that all cranes and scaffolding had been taken down and vessels in dock removed.

  15. Grace Agnew from London is on holiday 
    in New York. She writes: We have no idea when we will be able to get a flight out of here seeing as our old one was cancelled yesterday. It is frustrating when airlines don't pick up any phones or give any information.
  16. 1544: 
    President Obama has held a conference call about the hurricane with emergency officials, Reuters reports.
  17. 1541: 
    Katie, an emergency volunteer in New Jersey, tells BBC News that everybody is taking extra precautions and she has had to stock up on water and food and she says they haven't been able to get a generator. She says that there were massive queues at grocery stores and people were fighting over the last gallon of milk. But as one of the emergency medical staff, even if there is an evacuation she will have to stay in the town.

  18. Chris Waddicor in Monmouth Beach, New Jersey 
    writes: Evacuating inland about 10 miles to avoid the storm surge. Seems everyone in town has the same plan, glad people are heeding the call.
  19. 1536: 
    The first death caused by Hurricane Irene has been reported in North Carolina, the AP news agency says. Authorities there say that the storm blew a "large tree limb" onto the man, killing him. He had been walking outside his home in a rural area of Nash County.

  20. New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg
    tweets You can't prepare for the best case, you have to prepare for the worst case http://t.co/ytCJ3xH #Irene

  21. Angela Macropoulos in New York
    tweets Lots of chatter inside bagel store about who will actually evacuate. Ambivalence. #irene
  22. 1527: 
    Hurricane Irene remains a "large and dangerous" storm as it moves up the east coast, US Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano said at a news conference. Bill Read from the National Hurricane Centre, speaking via video-link, said that a storm surge was also forecast for Long Island Sound and metropolitan New York.
  23. 1524: 
    Craig Fugate from Fema, the emergency management agency, warns that tornados are expected but that they will be very quick, they will not be on the ground very long, but they can still be very devastating. That is why, he says, they are asking people to stay inside and way from external walls and windows.
  24. 1523: 
    Bill Read from the National Hurricane Centre says that the likelihood of the storm exceeding four feet is high aroudn the Delaware Bay.
  25. 1519: 
    Hurricane Irene will affect all resort areas of New Jersey on Sunday morning, the US national hurricane centre director says.

  26. Victoria Byres in New York 
    writes: Went out to get water last night and had to go to two different supermarkets. The shelves had been ransacked, water all sold out. It's cloudy but barely any wind yet! Last week our roads flooded so I imagine that will be our biggest problem in west New York.

  27. Fiona Lee in New York 
    has beentweeting about her evacuation: Safe and warmly welcomed at my friend's dig:lockerz.com/s/133343041

  28. Steve from Wilmington, North Carolina
    writes: We lost power this morning at 4am, there is tree debris all over the roads and a few trees have lost limbs. A friend has just bought some coffee over - I think the worst has passed.
  29. 1507: 
    Some bridges, streets and subways are virtually deserted in New York, AP reports, amid stern warnings about the approaching storm. As rain started falling, one resident expressed his disgruntlement. "What the mayor did - shutting down the transportation system - is more dangerous than the storm," said Daryl Edelman, a comic book writer. "People could be left stranded - especially the elderly," he told the news agency.
  30. 1459: 
    Forecasters say that tropical storm conditions have spread into coastal Virginia, Maryland and Delaware as Irene heads north, AP reports.

  31. Steve Holland from Reuters 
    tweets from Washington: Starting to get some #Irene rain in DC area and the air has this salty, beachy tang.

  32. Kim Severson of the New York Times
    tweets: At the local hospital in Wilmington, two babies born last night will have the middle name @irene
  33. 1454: 
    The storm knocked out power to nearly 250,000 customers in North Carolina and Virginia, the Reuters news agency reported. And a spokesman for Progress Energy told Reuters that operations at the Brunswick nuclear power station in North Carolina were reduced to ensure it could still run if the storm hit the electric grid.
  34. 1452: 
    The New York Times has curated a list of good twitter updates to follow charting the progress of the hurricane.
  35. 1449: 
    Former US President George HW Bush and his wife Barbara are planning to ride out Hurricane Irene at their summer home in Kennebunkport, Maine, the Associated Press news agency reports. But a spokesman says that they will follow the advice of emergency officials.

  36. The New York Mayor's Office tweets: Some 7,000 patients in hospitals, nursing homes and adult care facilities in Zone A and the Rockaways have already been evacuated. #Irene
  37. 1442: 
    ABC News has published a live storm tracker, where you can see Hurricane Irene's current position and likely path as projected by the NOAA's National Hurricane Center.

  38. Via Twitter 
    Wilmington-based journalist Judy Royal tweets: Still no electricity so sitting in my car working with a MiFi card (lifesaver) and plugged into power converter. #pinc #irene
  39. 1432: 
    More from Mayor Bloomberg's dramatic news conference: "The great danger to us here is from the storm surge, and there's no evidence that the forecast for that is changing." Officials fear that a surge of seawater - on top of new moon high tides - could lead to some flooding.
  40. 1428: 
    The Wilmington Star News in North Carolina has photos of the impact of Irene on the state.
  41. 1419: 
    The latest images of Hurricane Irene from space can be seen on Nasa's hurricane resource page.
  42. 1415: 
    New York City's subway system is set to close down at noon. City bridges may close if high winds make driving across them dangerous.

  43. Via Twitter Governor Christie of New Jersey 
    tweets Get the hell off the beach. Use common sense and get to safety as soon as possible. Watch video now: http://bit.ly/qckdqr #irene
  44. 1407: 
    The hurricane has already battered the Caribbean. Here are some readers' pictures as the hurricane swept across the region and made landfall in the US.
  45. 1405: 
    At a news conference Mr Bloomberg said this was a matter of life and death. Staying behind was "dangerous, foolish and illegal."
  46. 1400: 
    Hello. Welcome to our live page. As Hurricane Irene makes landfall in North Carolina, the mayor of New York, Michael Bloomberg, has issued a final appeal for people in designated evacuation zones to leave the city. Stay with us for the latest updates - reports from our correspondents on the ground and your reaction. You can contact us via email, text or twitter. We'll publish what we can.



Hurricane Season 2011: Hurricane Irene (Atlantic Ocean)






 


August 26, 2011, Third Update

NASA Satellites Catch Many Views of Hurricane Irene

satellite image of IreneThis visible image of Hurricane Irene from the MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite was taken at August 26 at 12:30 p.m. EDT, when Hurricane Irene was off the Carolinas. (Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team)
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satellite image of IreneThis visible image of Hurricane Irene was taken from the GOES-13 satellite on August 26, 2011 at 1:40 p.m. EDT. The extent of Irene's 600 mile wide cloud cover can be seen covering a third of the U.S. east coast. Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project
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satellite image of IreneNASA's TRMM satellite saw Hurricane Irene raining on the Bahamas on Thursday August 25, 2011 at 2118 UTC (5:17 p.m. EDT). TRMM' Precipitation Radar (PR) data shows that at this time Irene contained bands of intense thunderstorms dropping rain at the rate of over 50 mm/hr (~2 inches) north of the hurricane's eye. TRMM rainfall images are false-colored with yellow, green and red areas, which indicate rainfall between 20 and 40 millimeters (.78 to 1.57 inches) per hour. Dark red areas are considered heavy rainfall, as much as 50 mm (2 inches) of rain per hour. Credit:SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
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Hurricane Irene was spreading her clouds over the southeastern U.S. on Friday, August 26, and NASA satellites were flying overhead gathering data. Coastal evacuations were already happening in New York City, coastal New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and North and South Carolina.

NASA satellites gathered rainfall measurements and saw heavy rain and hot towering thunderstorms around Irene's center signaling the power behind her. Even on August 25, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite saw rainfall in intense bands of thunderstorms around her eye, that were dropping rainfall at 2 inches (50 mm) per hour.

NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Hurricane Irene from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on August 26 at 12:30 p.m. EDT, when Hurricane Irene was off the Carolinas. Although no eye was visible, Irene was still a Category 2 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson scale and it was still at that intensity at 3:10 p.m. EDT.

NOAA's GOES-13 satellite provided a much broader view of Hurricane Irene against the entire U.S. east coast on August 26, 2011 at 1:40 p.m. EDT. The extent of Irene's 600 mile wide cloud cover was obvious as it stretched over a third of the U.S. east coast.

Residents along the eastern U.S. coast are facing hurricane-force winds and inland areas are facing tropical storm-force winds. At 2 p.m. EDT on August 26, tropical storm force winds have already arrived along the coast of the Carolinas. Hurricane Irene's center was located about 300 miles south-southwest of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, near 31.2 North and 77.5 West. Its maximum sustained winds were near 100 mph and it was moving to the north near 14 mph. Minimum central pressure was 951 millibars.

Residents along the east coast need to heed watches and warnings and evacuations. Rainfall is a serious issue with Irene as she is expected to drop 6 to 10 inches with isolated amounts of 15 inches from eastern North Carolina into southeastern Virginia, eastern Maryland, Delaware, eastern Pennsylvania, New Jersey, southeastern New York, Long Island, Western Connecticut, and western Massachusetts through Monday morning.

The NHC said that dangerous storm surge levels as much as 11 feet are possible in the warning area in North Carolina, and up to 8 feet in southern portions of the Chesapeake Bay. The New Jersey shore can expect surges up to 6 feet above ground level.

Updated forecasts available through the NHC at http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/. Follow updates through the weekend from NASA Hurricane on Facebook andTwitter and at www.nasa.gov/hurricane.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



August 26, 2011, Second Update

NASA's TRMM Satellite Analyzes Hurricane Irene in Rainfall, Lightning, Eyewall

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Satellite known as TRMM has the ability to measure rainfall from space, and can also provide scientists with cloud heights, eyewall and lightning information. These images and captions of Hurricane Irene were provided by NASA hurricane scientist, Owen Kelley at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

In general, lightning in the inner core suggests the presence of strong updrafts and large ice particles. By implication, lightning suggests that convective cells are pumping a lot of latent heat energy into the tropical cyclone's central vortex, which is favorable for intensification. Hurricane eyewalls often are devoid of lightning, as is the case for Irene on 8/23. But cat-3 Irene (on 8/24) did have lightning flashes in the eyewall, and there were many flashes during Irene's tropical storm phase (on 8/21).






Three times this week (week of August 21, 2011) , the radar on the TRMM satellite has observed the three-dimensional structure of the rainfall regions under the cloud-tops of Hurricane Irene. At the same time, TRMM also observed Irene with passive microwave, infrared, and lightning instruments. In this image, the passive microwave estimates of surface rainfall are for all three overflights.






On Sunday, August 21, 2011, Irene was only a tropical storm, and the TRMM Precipitation Radar reveals that it had an impressive hot tower that reached over 9.5 miles high (15.75 km). Strong radar signals, perhaps from large ice particles are shown in red at the base of the hot towers, which suggests strong updrafts were present in order for the ice particles to have time to grow large. Strong rain had yet to completely encircle the eye, as is typical of tropical storms.






On Tuesday evening, August 23, 2011 Irene was a category 1 hurricane, in the process of intensifying to category 3 in less than 12 hours.Consistent with intensification, the TRMM radar showed that Irene had a complete eyewall circling its eye along with a region of intense convection on the eastern side of the eyewall (right side of image). Some studies suggest that bursts of convection in one portion of a hurricane's eyewall may help to pump latent heat into a hurricane and thereby assist with intensification.






On Wednesday afternoon, Irene had reached the status of a "major" hurricane, at category 3 strength. The observations of the TRMM radar show a compact eyewall, with the possibility that an outer eyewall is forming. Double eyewalls can be part of an eyewall replacement cycle associated with changes in hurricane intensity, either increases or decreases that are difficult to predict.

Text Credit: Owen Kelley, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.




August 26, 2011, First Update

AIRS infrared image of Hurricane Irene on August 26 at 2:59 a.m. EDT (06:59 UTC).› View larger image
This infrared image from the AIRS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite shows Hurricane Irene right off the Florida, Georgia and South Carolina coasts on August 26 at 2:59 a.m. EDT (06:59 UTC). There is a very large area of strong thunderstorms around the center of circulation and also in a large band of on the northeastern quadrant that appear in purple.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Infrared Satellite Imagery Shows the Power in Hurricane Irene

Infrared satellite imagery provides forecasters with the location of the highest, strongest thunderstorms that make up Hurricane Irene, and there is a large area of them.

An infrared image from NASA's Aqua satellite's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on August 26 at 2:59 a.m. EDT (06:59 UTC) shows Hurricane Irene right off the Florida, Georgia and South Carolina coasts. The infrared data showed highest, coldest thunderstorm cloud tops in two areas. There is a very large area of strong thunderstorms around the center of circulation and also in a large band of on the northeastern quadrant. Cloud top temperatures are colder than -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius) in those areas, indicating strong thunderstorms and heavy rainmakers.

At 8 a.m. EDT this morning Hurricane Irene was centered 375 miles south-southwest of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, near 30.0 North and 77.3 West. Irene moved 0.1 degree to the west in the last 3 hours. Maximum sustained winds were near 110 mph, and Irene is moving north at 14 mph. Minimum central pressure is 945 millibars.

Radar from Wilmington, North Carolina at 9 a.m. EDT shows the outer bands of Hurricane Irene just off the southeastern North Carolina coast and moving toward the shorelines.

The National Hurricane Center notes that some re-intensification is possible today and Irene is expected to be near the threshold between category two and three as it reaches the North Carolina coast.

Irene has continued to grow over the last week. Irene is now almost 600 miles wide. Tropical storm force winds extend 290 miles from the center. Hurricane force winds extend to 90 miles from the center or 180 miles in diameter.

There are hurricane warnings up and down the U.S. East coast, from South Carolina to New York. Coastal areas are under hurricane watches and warnings and interior areas tend to be under Tropical Storm Warnings and watches.

The National Hurricane Center (NHC) notes that "a tropical storm warning means that tropical storm conditions are expected somewhere within the warning area within 36 hours. A hurricane watch means that hurricane conditions are possible within the watch area. A watch is typically issued 48 hours before the anticipated first occurrence of tropical-storm-force winds...conditions that make outside preparations difficult or dangerous."

Rainfall is a serious issue with Irene as she is expected to generate rainfall accumulations of 6 to 10 inches with isolated maximum amounts of 15 inches from Eastern North Carolina into Southeastern Virgina, eastern Maryland, Delaware, eastern Pennsylvania, New Jersey, southeastern New York, Long Island, Western Connecticut, and western Massachusetts through Monday morning.

The NHC said that dangerous storm surge levels as much as 11 feet are possible in the warning area in North Carolina, and up to 8 feet in southern portions of the Chesapeake Bay. The New Jersey shore can expect surges up to 6 feet above ground level. Updated forecasts available through the NHC at www.nhc.noaa.gov.

Follow updates from NASA Hurricane on facebook and twitter and at www.nhc.noaa.govwww.nasa.gov/hurricane.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.




August 25, 2011, Third Update

GOES-13 saw Hurricane Irene moving through the Bahamas (left) and newly born Tropical Depression 10 (far right).› View larger image
The GOES-13 satellite saw Hurricane Irene moving through the Bahamas on August 25, 2011 at 1402 UTC (10:02 a.m. EDT) and far to the east was newly born Tropical Depression 10 (far left). Irene dwarfs Tropical Depression 10, and Irene is about 1/3rd the size of the entire U.S. East coast.
Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project


MODIS captured a visible image of Hurricane Irene's eye on August 24, 2011 at 12:15 p.m. EDT.› View larger image
NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Hurricane Irene's eye directly over Crooked Island in the southern Bahamas on August 24, 2011 at 12:15 p.m. EDT.
Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response
NASA Satellites Hurricane Irene Almost One-Third the Size of U.S. East Coast

Hurricane Irene is a major hurricane, and NASA satellite data shows its diameter is now about one-third the length of the U.S. Atlantic coastline. Meanwhile, far in the eastern Atlantic Ocean a tenth tropical depression formed. One satellite image captured both storms and shows the tremendous difference in their size.

NOAA's GOES-13 satellite saw Hurricane Irene moving through the Bahamas on August 25, 2011 at 10:02 a.m. EDT and far to the east off the African coast was newly born Tropical Depression 10. The GOES-13 image shows Irene to be almost one third of the size of the U.S. east coast. The distance from Augusta, Maine to Miami, Florida is 1662.55 miles. Hurricane Irene's tropical storm-force winds extend 255 miles from the center making Irene 510 miles in diameter, almost one-third the size of the U.S. Hurricane-force winds extend 70 miles from the center, or 140 miles in diameter.

GOES-13 images and animations are created at NASA's GOES Project at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

NASA satellites are providing valuable data to forecasters to assist them in the forecasts for Irene's track and power. As of this morning, a Hurricane Watch is now in effect for the coastal U.S.

On Thursday morning, August 24, a hurricane warning is in effect for the central and northwestern Bahamas. The National Hurricane Center (NHC) has also issued the first watch for the U.S. east coast. A hurricane watch is in effect for north of Surf City, North Carolina to the North Carolina-Virginia border including the Pamlico, Albemarle, and Currituck Sounds. A tropical storm watch is in effect for north of Edisto Beach, South Carolina to Surf City North Carolina.

NASA satellites are flying above Hurricane Irene, providing forecasters at NHC with temperature, pressure, wind, and cloud and sea surface temperature data. All of those things are critical in helping forecasters determine how Irene will behave and track.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Hurricane Irene's eye directly over Crooked Island in the southern Bahamas on August 24, 2011 at 18:15 UTC (2:15 p.m. EDT).

By 11 a.m. EDT on August 25, Irene had moved north and was 75 miles (105 km) east-northeast of Nassau near 25.9 North latitude and 76.8 West longitude. Irene's winds dropped slightly from 120 mph (195 kmh) to 115 mph (kmh) and it was moving to the north-northwest near 13 mph (20 kmh). The NHC, however, noted that some further strengthening is possible today and tonight.

Irene's minimum central pressure has fallen from 954 to 951 millibars since the day before, indicating the storm is still intensifying despite the slight temporary drop in maximum sustained winds.

Hurricane-force wind gusts were already reaching Nassau at 8 a.m. EDT. Hurricane force winds are spreading over the northwestern Bahamas this morning and the central Bahamas are still being battered by hurricane or tropical storm force winds, which will diminish later today as Irene moves away.

Residents in South Florida are also under warnings for dangerous rip currents and high surf along the eastern shores through Friday, August 26. A tropical storm warning in effect for the offshore marine waters of Palm Beach County, Florida beyond 20 nautical miles, and at 5:30 a.m. EDT this morning, rainbands spreading west over the adjacent Atlantic waters. Numerous showers and thunderstorms are expected along the south Florida coast today and tonight.

Far in the eastern Atlantic, Tropical Depression 10 formed about 435 miles (700 km) west-southwest of the southernmost Cape Verde Islands. It was centered near 12.4 North and 30.4 West, and moving to the west-northwest near 13 mph (20 kmh). Tropical Depression 10 (TD10) has maximum sustained winds near 35 mph (55 kmh) and may become a tropical storm in the next day or two. It is not expected to be a threat to the U.S. and is expected to remain at sea.

In the meantime, evacuation plans are already under way in North Carolina for the massive Hurricane Irene.

Updates on Irene's strength and forecast track can be found at the National Hurricane Center's website: www.nhc.noaa.gov. Follow NASA's Hurricane coverage on Facebook and Twitter and at the NASA Hurricane Web page:www.nasa.gov/hurricane.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.




August 25, 2011, Second Update

Hurricane Irene Near Northern Bahamas as Seen from the International Space Station




View of Hurricane Irene near the Bahamas as seen from the International Space Station on August 23, 2011.
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A digital photo from the International Space Station from Aug. 23, 2011, allows the viewer to look toward the southwest at part of Hurricane Irene churning near the northern Bahamas, including Great Abaco Island (lower right), Andros Island under a thunderstorm (center right) and a "fair" Cuba from left to right (upper center). The outflow and some of the banding of the northwest side of Irene are visible on the lower left. Meteorologists say Irene probably was centered over Acklins Island packing 120 mile per hour winds when the photo was taken. ID#-ISS028-E-030243 Credit: NASA



August 25, 2011, First Update

This is a 3-D Image of Hurricane Irene's clouds and rainfall at 7:11 p.m. EDT on August 23, 2011.› View larger image
This is a 3-D Image of Hurricane Irene's clouds and rainfall at 7:11 p.m. EDT on August 23, 2011. Areas in red mark the tops of deep convection towers near the center and in the outer rainbands with tops near 15 km (brighter red areas). Also, evident at this time is an area of shallow tops (in blue) near to the center where the drier air had worked its way into the storm.
Credit: SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce


This TRMM image shows a top-down view of the rain intensities within Irene at 7:11 p.m. EDT on August 23, 2011.› View larger image
This TRMM image shows a top-down view of the rain intensities within Irene at 7:11 p.m. EDT on August 23, 2011. TRMM revealed deep down under the cloud tops there is an eye surrounded by a complete eyewall of varying rain intensities (as evidenced by the complete circle in the rain field at the center of the image). The northeast corner of the eyewall contains an area of intense rain (darker red area - 2 inches/50 mm per hour) and the southern portion only light rain (shown in blue) with mostly moderate rain (green areas) in between.
Credit: SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce


Another 3-D view of Irene was captured on August 24› View larger image
Another 3-D view of Irene was captured on August 24 the storm, revealed once again the presence of a deep convective tower within the eyewall. The red area indicates rainfall rates of 50mm/hr (~2 inches), while yellow and green areas indicate moderate rainfall between .78 to 1.57 inches (20-40 mm) per hour.
Credit: SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce


TRMM next passed over Irene at 15:42 UTC (11:42 a.m. EDT) on the 24th as she was passing directly over Crooked Island.› View larger image
TRMM next passed over Irene at 15:42 UTC (11:42 a.m. EDT) on the 24th as she was passing directly over Crooked Island in the southeast Bahamas. Although the eye is somewhat obscured by the island, Irene did have a visible eye before passing over the island. Unlike the previous day's TRMM image, the rainbands surrounding the center were now very tightly wound and are more evenly distributed about the center.
Credit: SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
NASA's TRMM Satellite Provides an In-Depth Study of Hurricane Irene's Rainfall

NASA's TRMM satellite identified large areas of heavy rainfall within Hurricane Irene affecting the Bahamas, and helped forecasters identify its "hidden" eye. Over the days of August 23 and 24, 2011, NASA's TRMM satellite provided key information on rainfall rates, hot towering clouds that act as hurricane heat engines, and cloud heights.

After becoming a minimal hurricane while passing over Puerto Rico, Irene re-emerged over the warm, open waters of the western Atlantic northwest of the Dominican Republic on the morning of August 22nd. Irene quickly showed signs of intensifying as deep convective towers arose near the center of Irene, releasing heat into core of the system. In response, the central pressure fell and the winds intensified, making Irene a Category 2 storm on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane intensity scale with sustained winds reported at 85 knots (~100 mph) by the National Hurricane Center by the end of the day. Irene remained at Category 2 intensity most of the following day as it brushed the northern coast of Hispaniola heading west-northwest in the direction the Turks and Caicos Islands. Late in the afternoon on the 23rd, Irene weakened slightly after ingesting some drier air into its circulation. But the effect was short lived as new convective towers signaled that Irene was again ready to re-intensify.

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (or TRMM) satellite passed directly over Irene late in the day on the 23rd and captured these two images as the storm was bearing down on parts of the Caicos Islands. Images were taken at 23:11 UTC (7:11 p.m. EDT) on August 23, 2011.

One image shows a top-down view of the rain intensities within Irene. TRMM revealed that although Irene does not have a visible eye, deep down under the cloud tops there is an eye surrounded by a complete eyewall of varying rain intensities as evidenced by the complete circle in the rain field at the center of the image.

Creating the image is complicated. Rain rates in the center of the swath are from the higher resolution TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR), while those in the outer swath are from the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI). The rainrates are overlaid on visible and infrared (IR) data from the TRMM Visible Infrared Scanner (VIRS).

The image also showed that the northeast corner of the eyewall contains an area of intense rain (2 inches/50 mm per hour) and the southern portion only light rain with mostly moderate rain in between. The storm is still fairly asymmetrical, however, with most of the surrounding rain northeast of the center.

Another image taken at the same time shows a 3D view of Irene that shows "hot tower" clouds. The tops of these deep convection towers have precipitation-sized particles that are being carried higher into the atmosphere by strong thunderstorms. These storms within a storm can intensify tropical cyclones and hurricanes by releasing large amounts of heat, known as latent heat, via condensation. This heat can intensify the hurricane's circulation especially when released near its core.

TRMM showed several towers both near the center and in the outer rainbands with tops near 15 km (brighter red areas). These areas are associated with the areas of intense rain seen in the previous image. Also, evident at this time is an area of shallow tops (in blue) near to the center where the drier air had worked its way into the storm.

At the time of these images, Irene was a Category 1 storm with sustained winds of 80 knots (~90 mph). However, the central pressures were already beginning to fall and Irene re-intensified into a Category 2 storm just over 6 hours later.

Irene continued to strengthen overnight and by 8 a.m. EDT the next morning on the 24th, it had become a Category 3 storm with sustained winds of 100 knots (~115 mph).

TRMM next passed over Irene at 15:42 UTC (11:42 a.m. EDT) on the 24th as she was passing directly over Crooked Island in the southeast Bahamas. Although the eye is somewhat obscured by the island, Irene did have a visible eye before passing over the island. Unlike the previous day's TRMM image, the rainbands surrounding the center were now very tightly wound and are more evenly distributed about the center. These are characteristic of a larger, much more intense circulation as any rain features are quickly smeared around in a circle around the center by the stronger winds.

Another 3-D view of Irene was captured on August 24 the storm, revealed once again the presence of a deep convective tower within the eyewall. At the time of these last two images, Irene's maximum sustained winds were still 100 knots (~115 mph), but the storm's central pressures were continuing to fall, an indication the storm was in the process of intensifying. Just over two hours later, Irene's maximum sustained winds had risen to 120 mph. Irene is expected to pass through the central Bahamas and could become a Category 4 storm before threatening the US East Coast.

TRMM is a joint mission between NASA and the Japanese space agency JAXA.

Text Credit: Steve Lang, SSAI/NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.




August 24, 2011, Second Update

Hurricane Irene a Little Stronger, Eye Now Over Crooked Island, Bahamas




MODIS captured this image of Hurricane Irene on August 24, 2011 at 15:05 UTC (11:05 a.m. EDT).
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The MODIS Instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured this visible image of Hurricane Irene over the southern Bahamas on August 24, 2011 at 15:05 UTC (11:05 a.m. EDT). Just three hours later at 2 p.m. EDT, Hurricane Irene's eye was over Crooked Island, Bahamas, near 22.7 North and 74.3 West. Irene's winds increased to 120 mph (195 kmh) and it was moving to the northwest near 12 mph (19 kmh). Irene's minimum central pressure is 954 millibars. Image Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response



August 24, 2011, First Update

GOES-13 satellite saw Hurricane Irene entering the Bahamas on August 24, 2011 at 1302 UTC (9:02 a.m. EDT).› View larger image
The GOES-13 satellite saw Hurricane Irene entering the Bahamas on August 24, 2011 at 1302 UTC (9:02 a.m. EDT). Irene became a major hurricane shortly before this image and now has a clear, visible eye.
Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project


GOES-13 satellite imagery in 15 minute intervals from August 22 at 8:40 a.m. EDT (1240 UTC) until August 24 at 8:40 a.m. EDT› View GOES-13 movie
GOES-13 satellite imagery in 15 minute intervals from August 22 at 8:40 a.m. EDT (1240 UTC) until August 24 at 8:40 a.m. EDT shows Irene moving over Puerto Rico, Hispaniola and toward the southeastern Bahamas. Irene's eye becomes visible on August 24 at 0055 UTC (Aug. 23 at 8:55 p.m. EDT).
Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project, Dennis Chesters
Irene Becomes a Major Hurricane on GOES-13 Satellite Video

When a satellite can see a hurricane's eye clearly from space, that's an indication of a strong tropical cyclone and the GOES-13 satellite saw just that in Hurricane Irene this morning as she became a major hurricane. An animation of GOES-13 satellite imagery released from NASA today shows Irene's transition into a powerhouse and pinpointed when her eye became visible from space.

Hurricane Irene reached Category 3 status this morning, the threshold for a major hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson scale that measures hurricane intensity.

The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite called GOES-13 provides continuous visible and infrared imagery of the eastern U.S. and Atlantic Ocean basin from its position in space. GOES satellites are operated by NOAA, and the NASA GOES Project located at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. creates images and compiled them into the video of the storm as it developed from June 27 to June 28.

The animation includes sped up infrared and visible frames of data from the GOES-13 satellite and is squeezed down to 36 seconds. The movie shows satellite imagery that was captured in 15 minute intervals from August 22 at 8:40 a.m. EDT (1240 UTC) until August 24 at 8:40 a.m. EDT shows Irene moving over Puerto Rico, Hispaniola and toward the southeastern Bahamas. Irene's eye becomes visible on August 24 at 0055 UTC (Aug. 23 at 8:55 p.m. EDT).

Irene became a major hurricane at 8 a.m. EDT today, August 24, 2011 as it headed toward the Crooked and Acklins Islands in the Bahamas. Irene's maximum sustained winds had increased to 115 mph (186 kmh) making Category three status. Additional strengthening is forecast by the National Hurricane Center (NHC). Category three hurricanes can cause "devastating damage" according to the NHC's webpage:http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/sshws.shtml.

Irene is located about 55 miles southeast of Acklins Island, Bahamas, near 21.9 North and 73.3 West. It was moving to the west-northwest at 9 mph (15 kmh) and had a minimum central pressure near 957 millibars.

A hurricane warning is in effect for the southeastern, central and northwestern Bahamas, and a tropical storm warning is in effect for the Turks and Caicos Islands. An unofficial reporting station at Pine Cay, located in the Caicos Islands reported a wind gust to 65 mph (105 kmh) earlier today.

Rainfall amount across Hispaniola and Puerto Rico will be between 1 and 3 inches as Irene pushes away. However, isolated maximum storm total amounts of 15 inches are possible with flash floods and mud slides in areas of steep terrain. In the Bahamas, Turks and Caicos islands high rainfall totals are forecast by NHC of between 6 to 12 inches are expected.

The NHC warns that "an extremely dangerous storm surge will raise water levels by as much as 7 to 11 feet above normal tide levels over the central and northwestern Bahamas and by as much as 5 to 8 feet above normal tide levels over the southeastern Bahamas and the Turks and Caicos islands."

Hurricane Irene is a large storm that has continued to grow over the last several days as it has strengthened. Tropical storm-force winds extend out to 205 miles from its center, making Irene about 410 miles in diameter! Hurricane force-winds extend out to 40 miles, or 80 miles in diameter.

The NHC's current forecast track for Hurricane Irene takes the storm to a landfall in eastern North Carolina as a major hurricane on Saturday, August 27. The NASA GOES Project will continue to provide imagery and animations from the GOES-13 satellite daily as Irene nears the U.S.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



August 23, 2011, Second Update

image of Irene created from satellite data› View larger image
This image of Hurricane Irene was captured from NASA's Terra satellite when the storm's center had passed Puerto Rico at 15:20 UTC (11:20 a.m. EDT) on Aug. 22, 2011.
Credit: NASA Goddard/MODIS Rapid Response Team


image of Irene created from satellite data› View larger image
The GOES-13 satellite saw Hurricane Irene approaching the Bahamas on August 23, 2011 at 1932 UTC (3:32 p.m. EDT). No eye was visible in this image, but the extent of Irene's large cloud cover is seen from eastern Cuba over Hispaniola.
Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project
NASA Satellites Measure a Large Hurricane Irene

NASA satellites have been gathering data on Hurricane Irene as she heads the Bahamas today and tomorrow and observed that she is a large hurricane.

Irene's hurricane force winds extend outward up to 50 miles (85 km) from the center and tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 205 miles (335 km). That means that Irene is about 410 miles in diameter. That's just shy of the distance from Washington, D.C. to Boston, Mass.

NASA's Terra satellite captured an image of Hurricane Irene when the storm's center had passed Puerto Rico at 15:20 UTC (11:20 a.m. EDT) on August 22, 2011. The southern quadrant of Irene's clouds were still over the island bringing heavy rainfall. There is no eye visible in the image.

The next day, the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite called GOES-13 saw Hurricane Irene approaching the Bahamas on August 23, 2011 at 1932 UTC (3:32 p.m. EDT). No eye was visible in the image, but the extent of Irene's large cloud cover is seen from eastern Cuba over Hispaniola. NOAA operates the GOES satellites, and the NASA GOES Project at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. creates images and animations using that satellite data.

At 2 p.m. EDT on August 23, the center of large Hurricane Irene was 55 miles south of Grand Turk Island. That means that the island was on the fringes of hurricane-force winds as Irene continues to move west-northwest at 10 mph (17 kmh). Maximum sustained winds are near 100 mph (160 kmh). Irene is located near 20.7 North and 71.2 West. Minimum central pressure was near 977 millibars.

The Watches and Warnings cover a number of islands. On the forecast track the center of Irene will move near or over the Turks and Caicos Islands this evening and near or over the southeastern and central Bahamas tonight and Wednesday. Irene is expected to be near or over the northwestern Bahamas on Thursday.

The National Hurricane Center noted that "Irene could become a major hurricane by Wednesday."

Text Credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



August 23, 2011, First Update

This image of Irene from TRMM was taken at 15:57 UTC (11:57 a.m. EDT) on August 22, 2011.› View larger image
This image from the TRMM satellite was taken at 15:57 UTC (11:57 a.m. EDT) on August 22, 2011. This is a top-down view of the rain intensity within the storm. The center of the storm is located just to the southwest of an area of heavy rain (shown in red) about midway between Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic. Rainbands containing light to moderate rain (shown in blue and green, respectively) curve around the storm mainly to the north and east of the center.
Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce


This 3-D perspective of Irene was created from TRMM satellite data taken at 15:57 UTC (11:57 a.m. EDT) on August 22, 2011.› View larger image
This 3-D perspective of Irene was created from TRMM satellite data taken at 15:57 UTC (11:57 a.m. EDT) on August 22, 2011. It revealed an area of deep convection (shown in red) near the storm's center where precipitation-sized particles are being carried aloft.
Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
TRMM Gets a Look at Irene, the First Hurricane of the Atlantic Season

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite has been busy measuring rainfall within Hurricane Irene, and forecasts call for between 5 and 10 inches in the southeastern and central Bahamas and Turks and Caicos Islands as Irene moves toward them today.

It's been a busy season so far in terms of tropical storms with seven named storms already in the Atlantic basin; however, none of them have had a very large impact as they have either been small, short-lived or remained at sea and none of them have intensified into a hurricane until now.

Irene, which originated from a tropical wave that propagated off the west coast of Africa, became the 8th named storm of the season as it approached the Lesser Antilles on the 20th of August and the first hurricane of the season as it was passing over Puerto Rico on the morning of the 22nd. Now back over open water, Irene is poised to pass close to the northern coast of Hispaniola and poses a threat to the Bahamas.

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (or TRMM) satellite passed directly over Irene as it was leaving Puerto Rico and captured these unique images of the storm as it moving westward near the Dominican Republic. The images were taken at 15:57 UTC (11:57 AM EDT) on 22 August 2011. One image from TRMM data shows a top-down view of the rain intensity within the storm.

Creating the rain rate image is complicated and involves data from three instruments on TRMM. Rain rates in the center of the swath are from the TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR), and those in the outer swath are from the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI). The rainrates are overlaid on infrared (IR) data from the TRMM Visible Infrared Scanner (VIRS).

TRMM reveals that although a hurricane, Irene has not yet developed an eye and is not yet fully organized. The center of the storm was located just to the southwest of an area of heavy rain (as much as 2 inches/50 mm per hour) about midway between Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic. Rainbands, containing light to moderate rain curved around the storm mainly to the north and east of the center, revealing the presence of the storm's low pressure circulation, but one that is not yet intense.

The TRMM team at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. also created a 3-D perspective of the storm. It revealed an area of deep convection near the storm's center where precipitation-sized particles are being carried aloft. These tall towers are associated with strong thunderstorms responsible for the area of intense rain near the center of Irene seen in the previous image. They can be a precursor to strengthening as they indicate areas within a storm where vast amounts of heat are being released. This heating, known as latent heating, is what is drives a storm's circulation and intensification.

At the time these images were taken, Irene was a Category 1 hurricane with maximum sustained winds reported at 70 knots (~80 mph) by the National Hurricane Center.

At 8 a.m. EDT on August 23, Irene strengthened into a Category 2 hurricane. Irene's center was headed toward the Turks and Caicos Islands and the southeastern Bahamas. Irene's maximum sustained winds were near 100 mph (160 kmh). It was located near 20.6 North and 70.6 West, about 70 miles south-southeast of Grand Turk Island and moving to the west-northwest near 10 mph (17 kmh). Minimum central pressure is 978 millibars. Various hurricane and tropical storm warnings and watches are in effect and can be found at The National Hurricane Center's website: www.nhc.noaa.gov.

The rainfall rates seen by the TRMM satellite are reflected in the rainfall forecast totals by the National Hurricane Center (NHC) today. The NHC expects another 1 to 3 inches across Puerto Rico, 3 to 6 inches over northern Hispaniola and isolated amounts as high as 10 inches in higher terrain. The southeastern and central Bahamas and Turks and Caicos Islands can expect 5 to 10 inches of rainfall as Irene moves toward them today.

Irene is expected to be over the Turks and Caicos Islands and the southeastern Bahamas tonight and near the central Bahamas early tomorrow. Irene is expected to intensify and is expected to become a major hurricane and residents along the U.S. east coast are keeping close watch.

TRMM is a joint mission between NASA and the Japanese space agency JAXA.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



August 22, 2011, second update

NASA Sees Heavy Rain in Hurricane Irene, Satellite Video Watches Her Growth

Before Irene even reached hurricane status, a NASA satellite saw heavy rainfall and hot towering thunderstorm clouds around the storm's center this weekend. That heavy rainfall is expected as Irene continues to track through the Caribbean today.




A GOES-13 animation from Aug. 19, 2011, through Aug. 22, 2011, (1545 UTC/11: 45 a.m. EDT) shows the progression of Tropical Storm Harvey through the western Caribbean Sea and the birth of Hurricane Irene. Over the weekend, Harvey made landfall in Belize and is moving into Mexico today, Aug. 22, 2011. Farther east, System 99L developed into Hurricane Irene on August 20. Irene moved over Puerto Rico and is now moving west-northwest toward the southeastern Bahamas today. (Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project)

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite passed over Irene when it was a tropical storm on August 21, 2011 at 0024 UTC (8:24 p.m. EDT August 20). Data collected with this orbit showed that Irene contained numerous powerful thunderstorms with TRMM's Precipitation Radar revealing that some thunderstorm towers near the center of the storm were reaching to heights above 15 km (~9.3 miles).

image of storm Irene created with satellite dataThe TRMM satellite passed over Irene when it was a tropical storm on August 21 2011 at 0024 UTC (8:24 p.m. EDT August 20). Data collected with this orbit showed that Irene contained numerous powerful thunderstorms with TRMM's Precipitation Radar (PR) revealing that some thunderstorm towers near the center of the storm were reaching to heights above 15 km (~9.3 miles). Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
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image of storm Irene created with satellite dataThis visible image was taken from the MODIS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite on August 21, 2011 at 17:45 UTC (1:45 p.m. EDT) when Irene was still a tropical storm approaching Puerto Rico (left). Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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Those "hot towers" are called "hot" because they rise to such altitude due to the large amount of latent heat. Water vapor releases this latent heat as it condenses into liquid.

Back in 2004, researchers Owen Kelley and John Stout of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md., found that a tropical cyclone with a hot tower in its eyewall was twice as likely to intensify within the next six hours than a cyclone that lacked a tower. Irene had those hot towers and did intensify into a hurricane.

The National Hurricane Center noted on August 22 that Irene is expected to produce total rainfall accumulations of 5 to 10 inches across Puerto Rico, The Virgin Islands, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, the Southeastern Bahamas and The Turks and Caicos Islands. Isolated maximum amounts of rainfall may reach up to 20 inches.

In addition to the TRMM satellite, NOAA's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite, GOES-13 has documented the birth of Irene from a low pressure area called System 99L over the weekend. The NASA GOES Project at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. compiled four days of animations to show the development and movement of Hurricane Irene and former Tropical Storm Harvey.

A GOES-13 animation from August 19 through August 22 (1545 UTC/11: 45 a.m. EDT) shows the progression of Tropical Storm Harvey through the western Caribbean Sea. Over the weekend, Harvey made landfall in Belize and is moving into Mexico today. Farther to the east, the animation shows the development of the low pressure area called System 99L into Hurricane Irene on August 20 that moved over Puerto Rico and is now moving west-northwest into the eastern Caribbean today. Irene's maximum sustained winds on the morning of August 22 were near 75 mph. The 35 second video shows more than three days of development and movement of Harvey and Irene.

The National Hurricane Center has posted a whole host of hurricane warnings and watches today. A Hurricane Warning is in effect for the North Coast of the Dominican Republic from the Haiti border east to Cabo Engano. A Hurricane Watch is in effect for the north coast of Haiti from Le Mole St. Nicholas eastward to the Dominican Republic border and the central Bahamas. Tropical storm conditions will reach the northern portion of the Dominican Republic by this afternoon.

A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for the U.S. Virgin Islands, the British Virgin Islands, the south coast of the Dominican Republic, all of Haiti and the southeastern Bahamas and the Turks and Caicos Islands. The warning has been changed from hurricane to tropical storm warning for Puerto Rico, Vieques and Culebra as Irene is moving away.

At 9 a.m. EDT, August 22, Irene was moving away from Puerto Rico and toward the Southeastern Bahamas. Irene's maximum sustained winds were near 75 mph (120 kmh) and it was moving to the west-northwest near 14 mph (22 kmh). Irene's center was about 55 miles (90 km) west-northwest of San Juan, Puerto Rico near 18.8 North and 66.8 West. Irene's minimum central pressure was 987 millibars.

Irene is forecast to reach Florida later this week and if it makes landfall as a hurricane, it would be the first landfalling hurricane in the mainland U.S. in three years. The last landfalling U.S. storm was Hurricane Ike in Galveston, Texas in 2008.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



August 22, 2011, first update

GOES-13 Satellite Has a Busy Weekend in Tropics With Harvey and Irene

image of storms Harvey and Irene created from satellite dataThe GOES-13 satellite saw Tropical Storm Irene over Puerto Rico on Sunday, August 21, at 6 p.m. EDT. Credit:NASA/NOAA GOES Project
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System 98L exploded into Tropical Storm Irene on Saturday, August 20 at 7 p.m. EDT east of the Leeward Islands. Meanwhile, Tropical Storm Harvey made landfall in Belize.

On Sunday, August 21, a satellite image from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite called GOES-13 showed Tropical Storm Irene's clouds over Puerto Rico. Maximum sustained winds were near 50 mph and Irene is expected to be a hurricane on Monday, August 22, but is forecast to weakening after its center moves over Dominican Republic. Watches and Warnings were posted on Sunday, August 21 and continue through the eastern Caribbean. Current forecasts suggest Irene will again reach hurricane status before making landfall in southern Florida later this week.

On Sunday, August 21 at 8 p.m. EDT, Tropical Depression Harvey was over the Bay of Campeche and was expected to re-strengthen into a tropical storm. It was located 50 miles northeast of Coatzacoalcos, Mexico. A GOES-13 satellite image captured at 6 p.m. EDT pm August 21 showed Harvey's cloud cover as a circular area. Maximum sustained winds were near 30 mph, and Harvey was moving to the west-northwest near 14 mph. Tropical storm warning is in effect for the coast of southern Mexico from Punta El Lagarto To Barra De Nautia. Harvey's rainfall forecast ranges from 2 to 4 inches and isolated amounts to 10 inches. Tropical storm-force winds expected to reach the coast of southern Mexico with the warning area Monday morning.




System 98L exploded into Tropical Storm Irene on Saturday, August 20. This GOES-13 Video shows Tropical Storm Harvey making landfall in Belize (just beneath the Yucatan Peninsula) and moving into the Bay of Campeche Aug. 21, 2011, while Irene moved in from the east toward Puerto Rico (right). (Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project)

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.